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“In Speaking Being the reader discovers two original thinkers—Werner Erhard and Martin Heidegger—two intellects who independently reached linguistic, ontological, and phenomenological philosophies that illuminate each other. Authors Hyde and Kopp accomplish the formidable task of masterfully presenting Erhard and Heidegger side by side in a readable, lively, and illuminating text. There is nothing quite like it!”

~Jeronima (Jeri) Echeverria, Professor of History and Provost Emerita, California State University at Fresno, former Executive Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs of the California State University System

Your power is a function of velocity, that is to say, your power is a function of the rate at which you translate intention into reality.  Most of us disempower ourselves by finding a way to slow, impede, or make more complex than necessary the process of translating intention into reality…

Since now is the only time you have in reality and now will never seem to be the right time to act, one may as well act now. Even though “it isn’t the right time,” given that the “right time” will never come, acting now is, at the least, powerful (even if you don’t get to be right). Most people wait for the decisive moment, whereas people of power are decisive in the moment. – Werner Erhard

“Erhard’s influence extends far beyond the couple of million people
who have done his courses: there is hardly a self-help book or a management training programme that does not borrow
some of his principles.”
Financial Times

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“I am a sort of revolutionary.  I have a strange ambition, though.  I don’t want any statues. What I want is for the world to work.  I want to create a context in which government, education, and families are nurturing.  I want to enable, to empower, the institutions of man.  Social transformation doesn’t argue against social change.  Radicalism and resistance produce obvious values.  But after a while, social change chases its own tail.  Social change just produces social change.  After most ordinary revolutions, after most social change, the world still doesn’t work. For the world to work you must have social transformation, which creates the space for effective social change.”

Werner Erhard, from Werner Erhard, The Transformation of a Man, a biography by W. W. Bartley, III, Ph.D.,

In Speaking Being the reader discovers two original thinkers – Werner Erhard and Martin Heidegger – two intellects who independently reached similar linguistic, ontological, and phenomenological philosophies that illuminate each other.  Authors Hyde and Kopp accomplish this formidable task by masterfully presenting Erhard and Heidegger side by side in a readable, lively, and illuminating text.  There is nothing quite like it!” ~ Jeronima (Jeri) Echeverria, Professor of History and Provost Emerita, California State University at Fresno

Speaking Being: Werner Erhard, Martin Heidegger, and a New Possibility of Being Human, Wiley 2019

An innovative exploration of Heideggerian intersections in Werner Erhard’s Speaking Being

looks like a book

Speaking Being: Werner Erhard, Martin Heidegger, and a Technology of Transformation is a fascinating investigation of ontological questions of spoken communication. This unique work integrates two distinct features into one volume: a complete transcript of Werner Erhard’s 1989 Landmark Forum course lectures on Martin Heidegger’s concepts of the speech of Being and an extended discussion of Heideggerian points of intersection with the transcribed dialogue. Offering a comprehensive approach to the subject matter, this text presents a series of “Sidebar” discussions that occur alongside conversations between Forum participants and Erhard to provide clarity and context. Lengthier “Intervals” include in-depth examination of the central theme of the manuscript while providing wider perspective to surrounding regions of philosophical thought.

Martin Heidegger is widely considered to be one of the most original and influential figures of 20th century philosophy. His thoughts on the question of Being continue to elicit contemporary investigation. Through Werner Erhard’s discussions, this insightful text seeks to reveal what it means to speak the unsayable and evoke Being. This intriguing and highly engaging work allows readers to:

  • Read the complete transcript to Werner Erhard’s four-day course
  • Gain unique insight on Heideggerian concepts through in-depth discussion and analysis
  • Understand key discussion points with sidebar commentary
  • Explore central themes presented by leading scholars and educators in the fields of rhetorical pedagogy and ontology

Speaking Being offers a fascinating glimpse into Werner Erhard’s professional and personal development program, demonstrating its ontological and phenomenological approach to Heidegger’s concepts of Being. This innovative book will appeal to followers of philosophical thought and encourage further investigation of this stimulating field.

“I am a sort of revolutionary.  I have a strange ambition, though.  I don’t want any statues. What I want is for the world to work.  I want to create a context in which government, education, and families are nurturing.  I want to enable, to empower, the institutions of man.  Social transformation doesn’t argue against social change.  Radicalism and resistance produce obvious values.  But after a while, social change chases its own tail.  Social change just produces social change.  After most ordinary revolutions, after most social change, the world still doesn’t work. For the world to work you must have social transformation, which creates the space for effective social change.”

Werner Erhard, from Werner Erhard, The Transformation of a Man, a biography by W. W. Bartley, III, Ph.D., Clarkson N. Potter, Inc., 1973

“Your power is a function of velocity, that is to say, your power is a function of the rate at which you translate intention into reality. Most of us disempower ourselves by finding a way to slow, impede, or make more complex than necessary the process of translating intention into reality.”

~Werner Erhard

“Integrity is a mountain with no top. Therefore those who set off on this task must learn to enjoy climbing because there is no end to the process. And as the climb continues life continues to get better.”

~ Werner Erhard

Integrity is a Mountain with No Top - 6 day

“When I am not serious about my word to myself, it will show up consistently as various problems and difficulties in my life, the actual source of which I will obscure with various explanations and justifications. Moreover, I will show up for others variously as inconsistent, unfocused, scattered, unreliable, undependable, unpredictable, and generally unsatisfied as a person.” ~ Werner Erhard
http://ow.ly/flb830lrnkk

This is it. There are no hidden meanings.  Here is where it is.  Now is when it is.  You are what it is.

~Werner Erhard

perfect

Werner Erhard and Gonneke Spits

Werner Erhard and Gonneke Spits, 2010

The Multiple Facets of Integrity in Business and Management, Rutledge, 2018. Chapter 2, “Integrity: A Positive Model that Incorporates the Normative Phenomena of Morality, Ethics and Legality (Abbreviated Version)” by Werner Erhard, Michael C. Jensen and Steve Zaffron.

Editors Marc Orlitzky and Manjit Monga write:

In Chapter 2, Erhard, Jensen, and Zaffron present an eminently well-argued, positive model of integrity, which clearly differentiates integrity from morality and ethics.  They argue that integrity, a necessary condition for the workability and optimum performance of organizations, exists in a positive realm and, therefore, can be the subject of social scientists’ descriptive, observational study of behavior.  Their definition of integrity as honoring your word is clearly differentiated from the normative realm of morality, ethics, and legality.  The authors show that defining integrity as honoring one’s word provides an unambiguous and actionable access to the opportunity for superior performance and competitive advantage at different levels of analysis and empowers the three virtue phenomena of morality, ethics, and legality.  This chapter is most consistent with the conceptualization as behavioral integrity, the first facet of integrity introduced above.

Consider the following key findings unearthed in the survey of more than 1,200
finance professionals regarding workplace ethics by Tenbrunsel and Thomas (2015) entitled “The Street, The Bull and the Crisis: A survey of the US & UK financial Services Industry”. These findings quoted below provide striking indications that there has been little or no progress in reducing the out-of-integrity culture in the field of finance.

• our survey clearly shows that a culture of integrity has failed to take hold. Numerous
individuals continue to believe that engaging in illegal or unethical activity is
part and parcel of succeeding in this highly competitive field.

• 47% of respondents find it likely that their competitors have engaged in unethical
or illegal activity in order to gain an edge in the market . . . a spike from the 39% who
reported as such when surveyed in 2013. This figure jumps to 51% for individuals
earning more than $500,000 or more per year.

• More than one-third (34%) of those earning $500,000 or more annually have witnessed
or have first-hand knowledge of wrongdoing in the workplace.

• 23% of respondents believe it is likely that fellow employees have engaged in illegal
or unethical activity in order to gain an edge, nearly double the 12% that reported
as such in 2012.

• 25% would likely use non-public information to make a guaranteed $10 million
if there was no chance of getting arrested for insider trading. Employees with less
than 10 years experience are more than two times as likely as those with over 20 years
experience, reporting 32% and 14% respectively.

• In the UK 32% of individuals said they would likely engage in insider trading to
earn $10 million if there was no chance of getting arrested, compared to 24% of
respondents from the US.

• Nearly one in five respondents feel financial services professionals must at least
sometimes engage in illegal or unethical activity to be successful.

• 27% of those surveyed disagree that the financial services industry puts the best
interests of clients first. This figure rises to 38% for those earning $500,000 or more
per year.

• Nearly one-third of respondents (32%) believe compensation structures or bonus
plans in place at their company could incentivize employees to compromise ethics
or violate the law.

• 33% of financial service professionals feel the industry hasn’t changed for the better
since the financial crisis.

The continuing scandals are therefore strong evidence of the dismal failure of these
explanations to provide any effective access to reducing the counter-productive behavior.

These spectacular failures are, in fact, strong evidence that these explanations of the behavior are in fact false causes. While such false causes appear to provide a satisfying explanation for the behavior, note that they provide no effective access to altering the behavior. In fact, the almost universal assignment of false causes of the behavior that result in these damaging effects (exemplified by what we termed the “scandals”) (for examples see Appendix 1) actually obscures the real source of such behavior. We argue that the real source of this behavior is individuals or organizations being out of integrity (as we have said, their word not being whole, complete, unbroken, unimpaired, sound, in perfect condition). And it is one or more of the eleven factors making up the Veil of Invisibility (discussed fully in Section 3.h) that results in individuals and organizations not seeing the cost to themselves of their out-of-integrity behavior.

“Talking about transformation is no more than a representation, an image of the real thing.  It’s like eating the menu instead of the steak – neither nurturing nor profound.  It is in being transformed – in being authentically true to oneself – that one lives passionately free, unencumbered, fearless, committed.  It is in living life in a transformed way that the steak and its sizzle show up.”

-Werner Erhard

“To take a stand for the future is to bring forth a new opportunity, not one derived from the past, but an opportunity created from a future to which we give ourselves.”

  • Werner Erhard

You and I want our lives to matter. We want our lives to make a real difference — to be of genuine consequence in the world. We know that there is no satisfaction in merely going through the motions in life, even if those motions make us successful or even if we have arranged to make those motions pleasant. We want to know we have had some impact on the world. In fact, you and I want to contribute to the quality of life. We want to make the world work.

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“You’ve got to be with your self uninterruptedly for a long time. And that’s an experience which you and I don’t afford ourselves very often. You know, we stop for a cigarette, we stop to make conversation, we stop to divert our selves, to entertain ourselves. But, during this 60 hours [of the est Training], you really get to look deep down inside your self.”–Werner Erhard, 1976

“For several years before his latest professional reincarnation, Mr. Erhard consulted for businesses and government agencies like the Russian adult-education program the Znaniye Society and a nonprofit organization supporting clergy in Ireland.

Enter the Harvard economist Michael Jensen. Dr. Jensen, who is famous in financial circles for championing the concepts of shareholder value and executive stock options, had taken a Landmark course in Boston at the suggestion of his daughter, who mended a rocky relationship with Dr. Jensen after taking the course herself.

“‘I became convinced we should work to get this kind of transformational material into the academies,’ he said, adding that he considers Mr. Erhard “one of the great intellectuals of the century.'” – Peter Haldeman writing about Werner Erhard in The New York TimesUntitled-2